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Periodic Updates on Egypt by M. Cherif Bassiouni

Updates and commentary on developments in Egypt are available 7 February, 2011 onwards.

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What Egypt’s New Constitution Tells Us about Political Transition

By CORRI ZOLI and COURTNEY SCHUSTER, March 12, 2014 ( The Fletcher Forum for World Affairs). The piece discusses a controversial article of the 2012 Egyptian Constitution, which contained a narrow and exclusive definition of Shari’a, and how its removal in the 2014 constitution signals a more pluralistic constitutional process and future in Egypt.

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Sharia Strategy: Rule of Law Replacing the State

BY CORRI ZOLI & EMILY SCHNEIDER (Re-Published from Syria in Crisis, Jan. 4, 2014). On January 7, during the worst infighting between Syrian rebel groups to date, the head of the al-Qaeda–aligned Nusra Front, Abu Mohammad al-Golani, proposed that the rebels use an Islamic court to negotiate their differences. Calling for a ceasefire between rebel groups, Golani said the current infighting was the result of “incorrect policies” by the rival jihadi faction known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) …

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Shari’a Courts Move to the Battlefield

BY CORRI ZOLI & EMILY SCHNEIDER (Re-Published from Harvard Law School’s National Security Journal, Feb. 3, 2014) In the midst of some of the worst infighting between Syrian opposition groups to date, al Qaeda Central leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri, called on Syrian armed groups to unite, stating, “you are the hope of our Islamic nation in establishing Islamic governance in the lands of Syria, the chosen land of jihad” …

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Privacy in Muslim constitutions and Karzai’s refusal to sign the Bilateral Security Agreement

By CORRI ZOLI AND EMILY SCHNEIDER, January 2, 2014. It discusses one of the main sticking points defining President Hamid Karzai’s refusal to sign the bilateral agreement – his demand for a total ban on counterterrorism raids by NATO forces, particularly as these raids include entering Afghan homes at night. His antipathy towards raids has […]

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Fostering Synergies for Advancing Women’s Rights in Post-Conflict Islamic States: A Focus on Afghanistan, Egypt, and Libya

By HAMID KHAN, KATHLEEN KUEHNAST, MANAL OMAR AND SUSAN HAYWARD, November, 2013. This paper examines ways to champion and sustain progress on women’s rights amid renewed Islamic constitutionalism by searching for common approaches among Muslim women activists, members of the ulama, and legal advocates.

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Report of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry

November 23, 2011. The Report documents the findings and recommendations of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, which was established by His Majesty King Hamad in Royal Order No. 28 of 2011 to report on the events occurring in Bahrain in February/March 2011, and any subsequent consequences arising out of those events on the basis […]

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Report of the International Commission of Inquiry to investigate all alleged violations of international human rights law in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya

June 1, 2011. The Report details the findings and recommendations of the International Commission of Inquiry on Libya, which was mandated to investigate violations committed before, during and after the demonstrations witnessed in the country in February 2011, including during the Commission’s operation. The Commission looked into violations of international human rights law and relevant […]

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Patterns of Conduct: Libyan Regime Support for and Involvement in Acts of Terrorism

April 27, 2011. The Report provides a brief history and outline of documented examples of Libyan support, funding, and involvement in acts of terrorism and related international humanitarian rights violations over the course of Colonel Mu’ammar al-Qadhafi’s forty years of leadership.

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Redrafting Kant’s “Perpetual Peace”: Article Six

BY WILLIAM C. BANKS According to Kant, “some confidence in the character of the enemy must remain even in the midst of war, as otherwise no peace could be concluded and the hostilities would degenerate into a war of extermination.” In other words, accepting the inevitability of war, following a code of conduct during armed conflict distinguishes legitimate from illegitimate warfare …

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